Improvising

Because 5e is a much more open game, it’s capable of much more improvisation than other editions without causing the game’s delicate balance to fall apart. Some examples of improvisation that I allow and encourage are:

  • Team Attacks: Combining your abilities to attack in tandem, combining spells to form powerful combinations, or aiding an ally in some way (usually to give advantage to an attack roll, or to impose disadvantage on an enemy’s saving throw).
  • Ability Substitution: Using one ability score for a skill or task instead of the normal one, such as using Intelligence to pick a complex lock instead of Dexterity.
  • Combat Maneuvers: Maneuvers such as disarming, tripping, tackling, sundering enemy weapons and armour, snatching worn or held items, intercepting an attack meant for someone else, and other stunts not covered by the rules will be handled by rolling whichever ability is deemed appropriate for the situation with a DC based on the circumstances. Players are encouraged to be creative.
  • Called Shots: While not a guaranteed instant kill, attacking an enemy in a certain way or targeting a certain area can turn the tide of a battle, especially if you’re clever about it.
  • Unusual Spell Use: Using a spell in a way other than its intended use can result in gaining the upper hand during an encounter.

Improvising

Carnir: After the War Kuro